Introduction

Comments to the book "Learn You Some Erlang For Great Good" by Fred Hébert, Chapter 4 - Types (or lack thereof). Pattern matching is much easier to achieve in Erlang than in many other languages, but the syntax takes some time to get used to. Instead of if-else or similar conditional branching, in Erlang you simply use functional declarations with a pattern. Learning goals: Understand how Erlang's "crash first" philosophy and always accounting for errors works with dynamical typing to keep things safe. Challenges: See how the lack of static types does not mean that Erlang code is error prone.

Introduction

Comments to the book "Learn You Some Erlang For Great Good" by Fred Hébert, Chapter 3 - Syntax in Functions. Pattern matching is much easier to achieve in Erlang than in many other languages, but the syntax takes some time to get used to. Instead of if-else or similar conditional branching, in Erlang you simply use functional declarations with a pattern. Learning goals: Being able to create pattern matching, retaining unbound vs unbound variables, and how to work with guards. Challenges: Differences between unbound vs unboundvariables. Fully understanding how to work with guards.

Introduction

Comments to the book "Learn You Some Erlang For Great Good" by Fred Hébert, Chapter 2 - Modules. Understanding how modules work and how they should be organized. Learning goals: How to create a module. How to export functions in modules.

Comments to the book "Learn You Some Erlang For Great Good" by Fred Hébert, Chapter 1 - Starting Out. Challenges: Remembering relevant shell commands and understanding immutability. Important learning goals: Getting to know the shell and understanding the basic syntax.